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Wrist watch

//Wrist watch

Wrist watch

Collecting timepieces is not a new fad, but one enjoyed by men and women, the young and old alike. Essentially, there is something for everyone. Whether you collect p by maker, by style or by the type of movement, you can find things for any budget.
Most everyone has a watch. They were given as graduation gifts from high school or college, something that was handed down to you from a family member, or potentially a gift received from a company you work for. By collecting watches, not only do you have a fun collectible, but it also has function.
Over the last 100+ years, millions of watches have been produced. Some were made for the masses, others made in very small quantities for a select few. There are dealers that specialize in watches, but they can also be found at flea markets, garage sales, auctions, on the lntemet and at antique shops. Collecting creates an opportunity for you to have a watch for every occasion. You can have a watch to wear to work, one when out on the town, another one to use while participating in sports, and finally, an everyday watch.

Wristwatches have changed in many ways over time. Originally, they were made for women as an ornate piece of jewelry; pocket watch of sorts with a ribbon on each end to be strapped to the wrist. During World War I, pilots began wearing watches on their wrists to enable them to tell time quickly, as opposed to reaching into pockets in search of their watch. Once pilots began wearing wristwatches, it became increasingly acceptable for the rest of society to do so, too.

Watches had other noticeable changes over the years. What started as a mechanical-wind movement became an automatic wind, progressing to quartz and electric. Seiko was the first to produce the quartz watch. It was more accurate and cheaper for the average consumer. The evolution of the quartz timepiece put many wristwatch manufacturers out of business.
A few tips when buying for your collection:
1. Buy what you like. If you enjoy it, you can never go wrong.
2. Buy the best example your budget will allow. Remember, quality vs. quantity. It is always tempting to buy an inexpensive watch, but in the long run, it is better to buy something affordable and unusual, than inexpensive and readily available on the marketplace.
3. Until you learn more about what to look for in repairs, condition and reproductions, buy from resources you know and trust.
4. Pay close attention to condition.

VALUES

The values placed on the watches illustrated in this book are market value, representing what they have recently sold for privately or at auction. Values can fluctuate due to numerous variables. How a watch is sold, where it is sold, and the condition all play a big role in the value.

CONDITION
A few things to consider when purchasing a watch for your collection:
1. What is the condition of the dial? Do the numbers look faded? Is the name faded? Does the dial have any spots or water marks? Collectors tend to like things in very good to excellent condition. The cleaner, the better. Also, take into consideration if the dial has damage, it might have additional problems. For example, if it had water damage, there might be issues that go beyond aesthetic ones.
2. What is the condition of the case? If the case is gold tone, and the gold has started to wear, you might want to wait until you can find one in better shape. Are there scratches on the case? The case can often show signs of age, which is normal. The scratches can often be buffed out, provided they are not deep.
3. Is the band original? Many times, vintage watches had leather or cord bands. If these have been replaced, that’s OK. However, if the original metal buckle and leather band are no longer present, that can take away from the value. Also, if the band was originally metal and has been replaced with leather, that can also depreciate the value of a watch.
4. Does the watch have its original papers, and packaging? It is not necessary to have these items, but collectors are willing to pay a little extra if they are included.

CONDITION
A few things to consider when purchasing a watch for your collection:
1. What is the condition of the dial? Do the numbers look faded? Is the name faded? Does the dial have any spots or water marks? Collectors tend to like things in very good to excellent condition. The cleaner, the better. Also, take into consideration if the dial has damage, it might have additional problems. For example, if it had water damage, there might be issues that go beyond aesthetic ones.
2. What is the condition of the case? If the case is gold tone, and the gold has started to wear, you might want to wait until you can find one in better shape. Are there scratches on the case? The case can often show signs of age, which is normal. The scratches can often be buffed out, provided they are not deep.
3. Is the band original? Many times, vintage watches had leather or cord bands. If these have been replaced, that’s OK. However, if the original metal buckle and leather band are no longer present, that can take away from the value. Also, if the band was originally metal and has been replaced with leather, that can also depreciate the value of a watch.
4. Does the watch have its original papers, and packaging? It is not necessary to have these items, but collectors are willing to pay a little extra if they are included.
5. Does it run? Unless you repair watches, you might consider passing on those that do not run. Depending on the rarity of the watch, the cost to repair could exceed the value of the watch if working.
SELLING YOUR WATCH
If you are interested in selling a watch, there are a few things you want to consider. It helps to know the best venue in which to sell your watch, and represent it in an honest light. That means being able to tell potential buyers about materials (gold, stainless, platinum, etc), the era of manufacture, if the dial and hands are original, who made the movement, if if it keeps accurate time, has been serviced, and if so, when. Many buyers will also want to know how you acquired
the watch. Are you a dealer? Did you inherit it? The more you can tell them, the more comfortable they will feel purchasing it.
If your watch is valued under 0, you might consider selling it online. Ebay has numerous buyers and sellers of timepieces scouring the site every day. Another route would be online collectors clubs. They usually offer message boards A I * with forums geared towards dealers and collectors looking to buy and sell.
If your watch is a bit more valuable, you should probably reach out to an auction house that has a jewelry department. There are numerous auctioneers around the country that are reputable and can assist you in obtaining a premium price for your timepiece. When making contact with the auction house, make sure to have clear digital photos, and an accurate description of the watch to help them assess the auction estimate. Make sure to ask when their next sale is, when the deadline is for submission, what fees they charge, and finally, what is the timeframe in which they pay after the sale.
If you do not have the time to market your watch, my suggestion would be to sell to a dealer. You can locate someone in your area by visiting the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors Web site: www.nawcc.org

THE WRISTWATCH RUN—THROUGH
Not so long ago, if you wanted to learn more about wristwatches, you had to find a watchmaker, join the local chapter of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors, read a book, or wait for a watch show to come to your area.
Today, collecting and learning about collecting has become considerably easier. The Internet has paved the way for people to find unlimited amounts of information on wristwatch restoration, locating parts for a watch in need of repair (or a watchmaker, if you aren’t mechanically inclined), meeting dealers and private enthusiasts who collect via message boards and online discussion groups, and the ability to view hundreds of thousands of watches for sale with a few clicks of the mouse.
The lntemet has also changed the face of who is collecting. Thought to be an “older gentleman’s” market for quite some time, young male and female collectors alike have been popping up around the world. Collecting wristwatches has never had such a bro ad appeal!

Many of the younger collectors tend to gravitate towards the more modern watches, just the same as their tastes are often in the modern arena for furniture and decorative arts. The appeal of any of the asymmetrical Hamilton Electrics, or the Accutrons, along with the bold statement a great Rolex Daytona or Submariner makes are often what you see this generation searching for.

We’ve seen a slight rise in the values of lady’s watches because of the Internet over the past few years. Lady’s watches, however, seem to still be quite undervalued. Once thought of as “jewelry” only, many women have become fascinated with the history behind a watch, the inexpensive price to acquire stunning works of art encrusted with semi-precious and precious gemstones, and the uniqueness they bring to an outfit.
The Internet has helped collectors identify watches worn by their favorite celebrity, worn on the moon, in a car race, in their favorite action film, etc.
One of the not-so-positive aspects of Internet collecting is the sheer volume of reproductions out there posing as authentic watches. They turn up everywhere, with links to professionally designed Web sites offering the best of the best for a discount, or up for bid on an Internet auction. You must keep in mind the old saying, “If it looks to good to be true, it probably is.”
Not everyone is trying to put one over on you, but there are a few other concerns that should be addressed. One person’s definition of “excellent condition” may not be the same as yours. Some people are more accepting of “wear and age” than you might be.
So between dodging reproductions, and trying to determine if an authentic watch is in an acceptable condition for you to want to acquire it, there are a few questions you should consider asking anyone online before opening your wallet:
1. Many people assume if it doesn’t say it’s a reproduction, it’s authentic. Not necessarily so. Ask for a guarantee that the watch is authentic.
2 . How did they acquire the watch?
3. Do they have the original receipt for the watch? (If they do not, it doesn’t mean the watch is a reproduction, but if they do have the original receipt or paperwork, it helps you to feel more confident buying it).
4. Is the watch working? Seems like another question where the answer would be obvious. If you ask the question, you have the answer in writing, Should it arrive not working, you can go back to the seller.
5. How long have they had the watch? Is it something they recently purchased, or did they inherit it? If they are a collector selling some of their collection, the longer they’ve had it might give you confidence in how accurate their description of the watch is. The longer one collects, the more trained their eye becomes and the more knowledgeable they (hopefully) become.
6. What are the markings on the watch? Some case markings or movement markings will help you determine if the watch is all original, if the movement has been replaced, or might even tell you more about the period in which the watch was made.
7. Have they ever had the watch serviced? If yes, what work was done to it and when.
8. Ask for close-up images of the watch. Close-ups of the back, the dial and perhaps the band are a good idea. It is common practice for scammers to take a photo from someone else’s website and use it to sell a fake, or to take your money and send you nothing in return. If you ask for additional photos, and they do not actually have the watch, it will quickly become obvious when they cannot provide the images you ask for.
9 . What is their return policy if the watch is not as described? You should never buy a watch where there is no return privilege.
10. If possible, pay with a credit card. If the watch does not show up, or if it is not as described, you have recourse. If using Paypal, or another online payment program, look into buying insurance.

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By |2018-11-13T15:47:21+00:00October 13th, 2017|Blogs|0 Comments

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